free shipping. see details




Is Bee Venom the New Botox?


















Photo Credit: Getty Images 

Kate Middleton has it all. Among being a royal Duchess and fashion trendsetter, she also has her gorgeous  skin. Of course, this flawless beauty doesn't come cheap. According to Vanity Fair, Kate can’t go without her $250 bee-venom facial by Deborah Mitchell of London’s Hale Clinic and the Heaven salon in Shropsire. 

Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall, reportedly turned Kate onto these bee-venom facials shortly after the royal wedding. Kate has been a fan ever since and receives one before all official engagements, including the London 2012 Olympic Games. 

What exactly is a bee-venom facial? Well, it's not as scary as it seems. Dubbed the organic facelift, bee venom tricks the skin into producing more collagen and elastin, which helps smooth out wrinkles. The anti-bacterial and anti-inflammatory 


agents in bee venom also boosts the immune system, temporarily relaxes facial muscles, breaks down cell membranes and 

improves circulation. Translation: you can maintain a tighter complexion for a few days after the bee venom facial and look completely refreshed. Both Camilla and Kate use the at home treatment, Heaven Bee Venom Mask as well. 

Some compare it to Botox but if you want to try this at home don't go overboard! If bee-venom is used repeatedly, it can actually damage the skin, causing a severe allergy that may ruin cell membranes. Bee-venom is also used to destroy malignant tumors so in this case, you really can have too much of a good thing so watch out!

What do you guys thing of bee-venom facials?? Are they the new Botox or just another facial mask to choose from when you visit the salon?


Elle, the new Elfette on the block